Sports & Leisure

Assembly Rooms

Assembly rooms

BURLOCK Hillary
In the long eighteenth century, assembly rooms became an established institution in Britain’s towns and cities, growing in number over the course of the ‘century’. Assembly rooms across Great Britain became the physical and social heart of the community, places where men and women could meet to converse, dance, and attend lectures and concerts.
Cabinets of curiosities

Cabinets of curiosities

MARRACHE-GOURAUD Myriam
Au milieu du XVIe siècle, certains princes européens fortunés commencent à réunir des collections d’objets précieux, ou mirabilia, issus de la nature (naturalia) ou des arts (artificialia). La rareté de ces objets, leur excellence, leur bizarrerie énigmatique provoquent l’admiration. C’est l’étonnement devant la beauté ou la monstruosité qui désigne ces pièces comme des curiosités à élucider, et à montrer dans des ‘cabinets’.
Drury Lane

Drury Lane

RITCHIE Leslie
At London’s Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, sociability practices were realized, queried and transformed by actors and audiences. This entry describes the theatre’s physical spaces, then considers modes of sociability within the theatre, from normative theatre-going practices to disruptions such as riots.
English theatre (and transnational sociability)

English theatre (and transnational sociability)

MANCO Clara
In the so-called ‘long‘ eighteenth century (starting in 1660), the theatre can be seen as sociable space more than a site for a purely aesthetic experience. The sociability of the theatre however goes far beyond the space of the physical theatre itself.
London theatres

London theatres (and their audiences)

MANCO Clara
The analysis of theatrical prologues and epilogues, and of the sociological make-up of audiences and performance spaces, paints a picture of London theatre during the long eighteenth century as a complex ecosystem of sociabilities in which socio-economics and gender dynamics converged, making it a prime space of sociability.
Royal Menagerie

Menageries

SASSO Eleonora
Georgian menageries are to be seen as the predecessors to the more formal zoological societies of the Victorian era. As the British Empire expanded, private and public menageries were populated by exotic animals seen as objects of fascination and wonder and whose aim was to entertain visitors and guests as well as to satisfy the curiosity for the animal world.